Stories

How to Use a Wide-angle Lens for Street and Travel Photography

Interesting take.  Makes sense if you prefer the inclusion of the surrounding area or if you do not mind getting up close and personal with your subjects.

 

Out of all the lenses it is possible to use for street and travel photography the wide-angle lens is the one I struggle with the most.

Source: How to Use a Wide-angle Lens for Street and Travel Photography

100 Years Later: Remembering the Struggle of Jewish Soviet Photographer Yevgeny Khaledei – Resource

I came across this while reading through photography blogs.

Let us not forget what history has taught us about human monsters who are racist, brutal cowards who spend their lives hating even themselves.

And please do not forget that the pictures you take today are tomorrows history and you are the artists that can keep the world honest.

Source: 100 Years Later: Remembering the Struggle of Jewish Soviet Photographer Yevgeny Khaledei – Resource

A CALL TO ALL PHOTOGRAPHERS – Malta’s Famed ‘Azure Window’ Collapses into Sea During Storms

CALLING ALL PHOTOGRAPHERS

IT IS JUST TOO IMPORTANT TO PHOTOGRAPH THE WORLD AROUND YOU.  THE IMAGES YOU MAKE TODAY MAY EASILY REPRESENT THE ONLY HISTORICAL RECORD OF EVERYTHING AND EVERYONE AROUND YOU.

 

ALWAYS HAVE YOUR PHOTO GEAR AT YOUR FINGER TIPS

Residents, tourists and leaders expressed sadness over the loss of Malta’s Azure Window.

Source: Malta’s Famed ‘Azure Window’ Collapses into Sea During Storms | The Weather Channel

Rangefinder – How to Beat That Dreaded Creative Rut in Your Photography

Let’s face it.  From time to time we have all been knocked in the head by a total block when it came to getting out and about to create images.

Unfortunately, creator’s block knows no bounds. Photographer Ben Sasso offers some advice on what to do when it inevitably comes to you.

Source: Rangefinder – How to Beat That Dreaded Creative Rut in Your Photography

Are you dedicated to your art? Are you learning everyday? Are you capturing a world that only your eyes can perceive?

Are you dedicated to your art?  Are you learning everyday? Are you capturing a world that only your eyes can perceive?

Then you will want to watch these videos about life on the streets with dedicated photographers who face the challenges of recording that life everyday.

 

 

 

Do You Have A Signature, A Style, A Look to your Images? UPDATE

There have been some incredible photographers throughout the years and a great many of us have admired their work, technique, compositions, lighting, etc.  Besides their photography there are more than enough articles to read and digest about how to do almost anything in photography.  All of this is great to learn from and I am a strong advocate of constantly increasing one’s knowledge levels.  But that is where it should end because it is now for you to tell us who you are and what your look and style is that separates you from all of those educational sources.

Quite a few years ago I met a wonderful lady who was sort of just getting started in photography.  She had a passion to learn and learn she did.  But she also had desire to separate herself from the pack and create her look, her style and her signature.  By signature I mean I could  look at a bunch of photographs and immediately pull her work out of the batch.  She had created her own signature.  I used to joke with her about her approach to her images as being color creative as well as abstract.  And the more I joked the more I happily watched her develop her technique.  Her specialty was and still is flowers, yet she has diversified some what and she is doing excellent work within that diversification.

Willa’s Exceptional Web Site

So let’s everyone and anyone have at it. Begin to think about your photography as your own and not something that you are trying recreate as opposed to creating.  It requires some time.  It requires dedicating yourself to shooting for at least an hour a day, every day.  Shoot the things you like, create little projects for yourself.  Experiment with black and white, color, fiddle with composition, and work with as little gear as possible so you have the time to concentrate on what you are shooting as opposed to what you are shooting it with.

Don’t shoot the mountains because Ansel Adams did.  Unless of course you have a unique way of seeing and creating a great landscape.  Work on your street photography, not a famous street photographer’s work.  The lesson there is F8 and be there and the rest is up to you.

Work on architecture and learn how to apply tones in a way you want to see them.  Make black and white one of your signature moments.  Of course architecture can also be great in color but nothing beats black and white for tones and detail.  Study angles, crevices, play with shadows.  Have a ball.

Develop a style, your style.  Develop a look, your look.  And have your signature which combination of all the factors that put an image together the way you see it and the way you feel it and perceived it, which will become your signature.

In addition for this re-post I cannot stress enough the importance of a final print.  Nothing speaks more to your talent and your style than a print hanging on a wall.  Either do it your self or send a file off to a good printing service.  Be proud of your work and hang it.

Most of all love what you are doing, don’t take yourself to seriously and always remember it is not your gear that makes an image special, it is your signature.

5 Amazing Filters in Luminar (that don’t exist in Lightroom) — Nomadic Pursuits – a blog by Jim Nix

Terrific Software…Very powerful, complete, and a true replacement for Adobe Lightroom.  IMO

 

Have you heard about Luminar, but haven’t jumped in yet? Are you Luminar-curious? What are you waiting for?!  Luminar offers SO much, including these 5 amazing filters that you cannot get in Lightroom.  Check it out!

Source: 5 Amazing Filters in Luminar (that don’t exist in Lightroom) — Nomadic Pursuits – a blog by Jim Nix

hendriximages.com – a tale of a new lens and black and white done right

a tale of a new lens and black and white done right

If you are a Fuji X user or have at any time contemplated being a Fuji X user then this article is about why you thought about it and if your were smart why you did it.

 

 

 

To achieve such JPEG images SOOC and still get sufficient “punch” in the shadows I apply following settings in my X-Pro2´s Q-menu (saved as preset): ACROS-R film simulation GRAIN effect OFF (ACROS has its own built-in ISO dependent analogue grain effect) -3 NR (noise reduction) DR auto (auto dynamic range) -1 H-TONE (highlights contrast) +3 S-TONE (shadows contrast for sufficient “punch”) +1 SHARP (sharpening)I´ve discovered that the sweet spot (detail rendering vs. micro-contrast vs. grain) for ACROS simulation is around 2000 ISO. To compensate the JPEG´s reduced highlights & shadows recovery latitude (vs. doing RAW development) I set the highlights tone to -1 (increased highlight tonal range) and my dynamic range to “Auto” (automatically adjusts dynamic range to the subject contrast), see example image below:

Source: hendriximages.com